Posted by: rcottrill | February 14, 2019

At Even Ere the Sun Was Set

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Henry Twells (b. Mar. 13, 1823; d. Jan. 19, 1900)
Music: Angelus, by George Joseph (b. circa 1630; d. circa 1668)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (for another article see here)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Henry Twells was both a Church of England clergyman and a school master. In 1856, he became headmaster of Godolphin School, Hammersmith, London. It seems to be while he was there that this hymn was written. The story of how the hymn was inspired is told in the first Wordwise Hymns link above.

The second link to a Wordwise Hymns page takes up the question that has been raised by Twells’s words “ere [before] the sun was set, since the Sabbath was not over until sunset on the Saturday, and carrying burdens (such as a sick person on a litter) was forbidden.

Years ago we had a car that developed an odd problem. The motor kept cutting out, then starting up again, over and over, as we drove along. (It certainly slowed us down!) The car was taken into the service station many times, where mechanics tried this and that to correct the trouble and failed. One installed a part at a cost of hundreds of dollars. But when it didn’t help, he had to remove it.

Then, finally, we took it to a new mechanic, one who’d actually been trained in the factory where the car was made. We described the malady to him, and told him how long we’d tried to find a solution but couldn’t. He grinned and said, “Oh, I know what’s going on there.” And he quickly replaced a small part, that cost the large sum of $1.69. Problem solved!

When a car or some appliance breaks down, we expect that the manufacturer–or someone trained by them–will know what to do to deal with the trouble. There is, of course, a spiritual application of this. When we pray about some need or difficulty, we’re appealing to the divine Manufacturer, God Himself. The Bible says, “God created man in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them” (Gen. 1:27). And God the Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, was an active Agent in that creative work (Jn. 1:3; Col. 1:15-17; Heb. 1:1-3).

When we pray, we “kneel before the Lord our Maker” (Ps. 95:6). It’s in the confidence that He understands and will have the remedy we need that we come to the Lord with our requests.

“Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God” (Phil. 4:6).

Sometimes He will deliver us from the trouble, but not always, not on this side of heaven. When He does not, He pledges to provide the enabling grace to sustain us through it, equipping us in the midst of it to glorify Him, and serve Him (II Cor. 12:7-9).

This means of obtaining just what we need is suggested in a fine hymn by Henry Twells. At Even, Ere the Sun Was Set is based on a scene described in three of the Gospels. Luke tells us:

“When the sun was setting, all those who had any that were sick with various diseases brought them to Him; and He laid His hands on every one of them and healed them” (Lk. 4:40).

CH-1) At even, ere the sun was set,
The sick, O Lord, around Thee lay;
O in what diverse pains they met!
O, with what joy they went away!

Canon Twells refers to about a dozen problems we can bring to the Lord. Some are sick, physically ill, and perhaps in pain. Some are sad, emotionally distressed or depressed. Some are snowed under by “worldly care” perhaps burdens regarding finances or lost employment. And some wrestle with powerful passions of lust, greed, and so on.

Elsewhere I have written about these, but I want to concentrate, this time, particularly on two of the eight insightful stanzas, the second and the eighth.

The author brings that biblical scene of two millennia ago into the present with:

CH-2) Once more ’tis eventide, and we,
Oppressed with various ills, draw near;
What if Thy form we cannot see?
We know and feel that Thou art here.

He is the ever-present Christ, as He promised He would be (Matt. 28:20). Though, as our great High Priest, He sits at the Father’s right hand in heaven (Rom. 8:34), in His divine omnipresence He is as near as a whisper, or a wordless groan of pain.

And, in the final stanza we have:

CH-8) Thy touch has still its ancient power.
No word from Thee can fruitless fall;
Hear, in this solemn evening hour,
And in Thy mercy heal us all.

God’s Word encourages us to tell our compassionate Saviour about our trials, with the confidence that the Lord hears and answers prayer, according to His will (I Jn. 5:14).

“We do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need” (Heb. 4:15-16).

Questions:
1) What is the most urgent or painful trial you have just now that you can bring to the Lord in prayer?

2) Do you know someone who is suffering, for whom you could be part of God’s answer to prayer for them, perhaps by some practical assistance, or words of encouragement?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (for another article see here)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | February 11, 2019

The Theme of My Song

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Haldor Lillenas (b. Nov. 19, 1885; d. Aug. 18, 1959)
Music: Haldor Lillenas

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Haldor Lillenas born, died)
The Cyber Hymnal (Haldor Lillenas)
Hymnary.org

Note: Lillenas was a pastor and an evangelist. But he made his widest impact with the many gospel songs he wrote. The Cyber Hymnal lists nearly four hundred of them, but that is a mere quarter of his total output.

The word “theme” has been around for a long time, coming down from ancient Greek and Latin (thema in both). A theme is a subject–the subject of a book or an article, or of a speech or sermon. But, more than that, it’s a kind of unifying idea, a conviction, or value that connects various parts of a story or touches us where we live, day by day.

So, what are some common themes of life? Here are a few that influence how we think and plan, what we do and say: The dignity and worth of each individual person; balancing rights and responsibilities in life; the importance of family and community; protecting and aiding the poor and vulnerable in society; dealing with technology, its benefits and potential dangers; the proper care and stewardship of earth’s resources

Even a few moments’ thought would show what we know and believe in these areas can have a profound affect on each of us. And when we turn to the Bible, we find many connecting themes there, too. Back in 1926, a theologian named Lewis Sperry Chafer published a book entitled Major Bible Themes. In it, Dr. Chafer deals with about fifty significant ideas that permeate the Word of God.

But let’s see if we can simplify things. There are three themes that seem to saturate the Scriptures from Genesis to Revelation–and, as we’ll see in a moment, all three are clearly expressed in a single Bible verse. The three are:

1) The love and grace (unmerited favour) of God;
2) God’s plan of salvation for lost sinners;
3) The person and work of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Those three can be clearly seen again and again., and they are ultimately inseparable.

1) First, the simple phrase “the love of God” is found a dozen times from Luke through to Jude. The Bible speaks of “the kindness and love of God” (Tit. 3:4), and tells us “God is love” (I Jn. 4:8, 19). The latter is not meant in the sense that God is some kind of impersonal force. Nor can we say the opposite, that love is God. John means that love is a pervasive and overarching characteristic of God. It is an outstanding quality evident in God’s dealings with mankind.

2) Second, God, in love, has provided a means of eternal salvation for us. He says, “I have no pleasure in the death of one who dies” (Ezek. 18:32). And He has a plan to save us. As a basic principle, it’s this: that an innocent substitute be offered up to take sin’s punishment in our place. That is the basis of the Old Testament sacrificial system. An animal was slain, and when the offerer placed his hand on the head of the dead animal (Lev. 1:3-4), he was saying, in effect, this animal is dying in my place.

But that was only effective because God saw it as a symbol pointing forward to something greater yet to come. An animal can’t pay for human sin. “It is not possible that the blood of bulls and goats could take away sin” (Heb. 10:4). A human being was needed. But there’s a serious problem with that. The Bible says, “All have sinned” (Rom. 3:23). All of us stand guilty before God, and deserve to die for our own sins. There is no “innocent substitute” who can die for others.

3) That’s where the third theme, about Christ comes in–and Christ Himself makes it plain that the truth about Him is taught all through the Bible (Lk. 24:27, 44; Jn. 5:39). The matter of our salvation is why the Lord Jesus came to this earth, as Man, to die for us. And it is John 3:16 that beautifully ties all three themes together:

“For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life” (Jn. 3:16).

“The Father has sent the Son as Saviour of the world” (I Jn. 4:14; cf. vs. 9-10). And the Son of God shares the Father’s love for lost humanity. Paul testifies, “The Son of God…loved me, and gave Himself for me. (Gal. 2:20).

The person of Christ, and the salvation a loving God provides through faith in Him is, in effect, the greatest Bible theme of all. That’s expressed in a song called The Theme of My Song, by hymn writer Haldor Lillenas. It seems to reflect the purpose of his whole ministry: to exalt the Lord Jesus Christ and tell others what He has done for us.

1) Others may sing of treasures of earth,
Sing of its glitter and gold,
But I have a theme of far greater worth,
Exhaustless, it never grows old.

He is the lovely theme of my song,
He is my light from afar;
Glory and praise shall to Him belong,
He is my bright Morning Star;
Strength for my weakness He doth impart,
He is the joy of my longing heart,
Fair Rose of Sharon is Jesus to me;
He is the theme of my song.

3) Fresh as the dew that falls from above,
Welcome as dawn with its light;
The story of Jesus, story of love,
Brings ever increasing delight.

Questions:
1) What, in your view, are some of the most wonderful things about the Lord Jesus Christ?

2) What are some of the most wonderful things about God’s salvation?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Haldor Lillenas born, died)
The Cyber Hymnal (Haldor Lillenas)
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | February 7, 2019

Arise, My Soul, Arise

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words:
Charles Wesley (b. Dec. 18, 1707; d. Mar. 29, 1788)
Music: Lenox (also called Edson), by Lewis Edson (b. Jan. 22, 1748; d. ____, 1820)

Links:

Wordwise Hymns (for another article see here)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Charles Wesley was the hymn writing partner of his brother, preacher John Wesley. God used the team to bring spiritual light and revival to England in the eighteenth century. Charles wrote over 6,000 hymns, and many are found in hymn books printed today. Christ the Lord Is Risen Today; Love Divine, All Loves Excelling; Jesus, Lover of My Soul; Hark, the Herald Angels Sing; Soldiers of Christ, Arise; O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing; And Can It Be? and many more came from his pen.

Our sleep is necessary and therapeutic, But sleeping at the wrong time can be a problem. I heard of a fellow who used to fall asleep in church. One Sunday, as a practical joke, a friend nudged him and whispered, “The pastor wants you to close in prayer.” Flustered, he stood up and began to pray–in the middle of the service! (I wonder if that cured him of nodding off!)

There are other circumstances in which people sleep on. Some do so in the morning, when it’s time to stir and get on with the day. I know of one who sets three alarm clocks, one at the head of the bed, another–a loud one–across the room, and a third in a nearby room. Often it’s to no avail. The sleeper slumbers on, with bells ringing and buzzers buzzing.

The Bible sometimes uses sleep to picture a lack of awareness of spiritual things.

To the sinner in darkness, Scripture says, “Awake, you who sleep, arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light” (Eph. 5:14).

To Christians who need to guard against temptation and spiritual lethargy, comes this exhortation: “Let us not sleep, as others do, but let us watch and be sober” (I Thess. 5:6).

And since we don’t know the time of Christ’s return, we need to be alert, and active in our service for Him. “Owe no one anything except to love one another….And do this, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep; for now our salvation is nearer [i.e. the final consummation of it] than when we first believed” (Rom. 13:8, 11).

In 1742 Wesley published a hymn to remind believers of what is theirs, through faith in Christ. The language is dramatic and riveting. And it begins with a call to wake up, rouse ourselves, and get our minds in gear, to realize what God has done for us! Here are the words of the entire hymn, with some relevant Scripture texts interspersed. (Note: a “surety” is a guarantee.)

CH-1) Arise, my soul, arise; shake off thy guilty fears;
The bleeding Sacrifice in my behalf appears:
Before the throne my Surety stands,
Before the throne my Surety stands,
My name is written on His hands [Isa. 49:16a].

CH-2) He ever lives above, for me to intercede [Heb. 7:25];
His all redeeming love, His precious blood, to plead:
His blood atoned for all our race [I Tim. 2:6],
His blood atoned for all our race ,
And sprinkles now the throne of grace [Heb. 12:24].

CH-3) Five bleeding wounds He bears; received on Calvary;
They pour effectual prayers; they strongly plead for me:
‘Forgive him, O forgive,’ they cry,
‘Forgive him, O forgive,’ they cry,
‘Nor let that ransomed sinner die!’

CH-4) The Father hears Him pray, His dear Anointed One;
He cannot turn away, the presence of His Son;
His Spirit answers to the blood,
His Spirit answers to the blood,
And tells me I am born of God [Rom. 8:16].

CH-5) My God is reconciled; His pardoning voice I hear [Rom. 5:5, 11];
He owns me for His child [Gal. 3:26]; I can no longer fear:
With confidence I now draw nigh [Heb. 4:15-16],
With confidence I now draw nigh,
And “Father, Abba, Father,” cry.

The word “Abba” is an almost untranslatable Aramaic word, a tender expression of affection. The phrase could be paraphrased, “Father, dearest Father.” As the Bible puts it, “You did not receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption by whom we cry out, ‘Abba, Father’” (Rom. 8:15). Amen!

Questions:
1) What are two reasons Christians can be confident of salvation (related to what Christ has done, and what the Holy Spirit has done and does)?

2) If the above is true, what may be the source of our nagging “guilty fears”?


Links:

Wordwise Hymns (for another article see here)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | February 4, 2019

The Riches of Love

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Henry Burns Hartzler (b. Mar. 23, 1840; d. Sept. 3, 1920)
Music: N. B. Sargent (see here)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal (Henry Hartzler)
Hymnary.org

Note: Henry Hartzler was a pastor and Bible teacher in Pennsylvania. He wrote a number of hymns too. Hartzler was associated with evangelist Dwight L. Moody. The present song, The Riches of Love, from 1888, is arranged as a duet in the book in which I found it–though I see Hymnary.org has it in four-part harmony. We know nothing of N. B. Sargent who wrote the tune. He produced a number of other gospel songs himself, sometimes both words and music. He seems to have lived around the same time as Hartzler.

The discovery of gold deposits, and the lure of great riches, precipitated two historic events on the North American continent.

The first was the California Gold Rush (1848-1855). When gold was discovered at Sutter’s Mill, in Coloma, some 300,000 people made there way there, from the eastern States and beyond. Before they were done, an estimated two billion dollars worth of the precious metal had been taken from the ground.

The second was the Klondike Gold Rush (1896-1899). It lasted for a shorter time, and was more modest in its scope, partly due to the remote area in the Yukon where the gold was found. Somewhere between 30,000 and 40,000 prospectors made their way there, and found about a billion dollars worth of gold.

That may sound like a lot. But the two gold rushes didn’t end in all those seekers getting rich. Very few did. Most laboured on for awhile and made modest discoveries that may hardly have covered their expenses. The trip itself was difficult and costly, and prices for goods when they got there were high. The work was hard, and sometimes dangerous. The conditions were primitive, and the camps sometimes wild and lawless. Many returned home broken and discouraged, with little to show for their labours.

The Bible speaks many times about the seductive folly of riches, particularly in the book of Proverbs. “He who trusts in his riches will fall” (Prov. 11:28). “For riches certainly make themselves wings; they fly away like an eagle toward heaven” (Prov, 23:5). “A good name is to be chosen rather than great riches” (Prov. 22:1). “The love of money is the root of all kinds of evil” (I Tim. 6:10). Not only that, it will always be temporal and fleeting. “For we brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out” (I Tim. 6:7).

We’re to put our faith in God, not in what the Bible calls “uncertain riches” (I Tim. 6:17). In the will of God, some gain material wealth, but it’s important that no one make the acquisition of it their life’s goal. Rather, the rich should invest their wealth and possessions in serving the Lord and helping others. The Lord Jesus called this laying up treasures in heaven, an investment for eternity (Matt. 6:19-20).

Instead of material gain, the Word of God points us to the greater riches of spiritual blessings, “the riches of [God’s] goodness” (Rom. 2:4), “the unsearchable [boundless, fathomless, incalculable, and exhaustless] riches of Christ” (Eph. 3:8), and “the riches of His grace” (Eph. 1:7), which will continue blessing us for all eternity (Eph. 2:7). Unlike the fleeting riches of this world, “The blessing of the Lord makes one rich, and He adds no sorrow with it” (Prov. 10:22).

The Riches of Love celebrates the wonderful love of God which blesses us in so many ways, through Christ (Phil. 4:19). God’s love for the believer is great (Eph. 2:4), and everlasting (Jer. 31:3). And nothing “shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Rom. 8:30).

1) The treasures of earth are not mine,
I hold not its silver and gold;
But a treasure far greater is mine;
I have riches of value untold.

Oh, the depths of the riches of love,
The riches of love in Christ Jesus,
Far better than gold, or wealth untold,
Are the riches of love in Christ Jesus.

2) The treasures of earth must all fail,
Its riches and honour decay,
But the riches of love that are mine,
Even death cannot take them away.

4) Come, take of the riches of Christ,
Exhaustless, and free is the store,
Of its wonderful fullness receive,
Till you hunger and thirst nevermore.

Questions:
1) In addition to giving us eternal salvation, through faith in Christ, what are some of the other “riches” with which the Lord has blessed us?

2) What are some of the contrasts between the riches of this world, and the riches a loving God gives to us?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal (Henry Hartzler)
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | January 31, 2019

Another Year Is Dawning

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Frances Ridley Havergal (b. Dec. 14, 1836; d. June 3, 1879)
Music: Aurelia, by Samuel Sebastian Wesley (b. Aug. 14, 1810; d. Apr. 19, 1876)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (for another article see here)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Frances Havergal was a brilliant woman, and deeply spiritual. Though she only lived into her forties, her many hymns have had a lasting impact on the church. Samuel Wesley, the composer of this excellent tune, was the grandson of hymn writer Charles Wesley. We use Aurelia also for The Church’s One Foundation.

It’s a day like any other day. January first. Yet we mark it as the beginning of a new year. Why? Why not start in September, when holiday time ends for many and we get back to work? Or what about beginning the year in March, with the start of spring? That’s what they did in ancient Rome, until 45 BC.

In 45 BC, Roman emperor Julius Caesar, commissioned the creation of the Julian calendar. And in that pre-Christian era, the first day of January was dedicated to Janus, their god of gateways and beginnings–for whom the month itself is also named. It became the “gateway” to the new year. Another improved calendar was designed in 1582. Commissioned by Pope Gregory XIII, the Gregorian calendar, is the one we use today, and it retains the starting point of January 1st.

Though that calendar is recognized the world over, various cultures and religious traditions put the celebration of a new year in different places. Chinese New Year begins on the new moon that appears between January 21 and February 20. And the Jewish festival of Rosh Hashana (meaning head of the year) is held on the first (also sometimes the second) day of Tishri (in our September).

And do you remember the anxiety over “Y2K,” when the calendar was about to click over from 1999 to 2000. Computers were using only two digits to note the year. So, did that mean they would go from 99 to 00? Year zero? What would that do to other computer calculations? Some predicted all the world’s computers would fail, and it would bring the end of the world. But programs were upgraded in time and there were very few problems.

That’s the history of it. But even though there’s no scientific basis for January 1st being the beginning of a new year, the tradition is deeply ingrained. Therefore it’s appropriate for us–especially those who are Christians–to reflect upon what it means to our spiritual lives.

It’s interesting that the god Janus for whom January was named is depicted as having two faces, one looking back and one ahead. And at the start of a new calendar year, we can look back on the year that’s past, and how the Lord has blessed us. As David the psalmist says, “You crown the year with Your goodness, and Your paths drip with abundance” (Ps. 65:11). We can do what Johnson Oatman’s gospel song calls us to:

Count your blessings, name them one by one,
And it will surprise you what the Lord hath done.

Then, there is the need to look ahead. The difficulty there is that none of us knows with certainty what the new year will bring. We need to make our plans. The Lord Jesus assures us that is wise. “Which of you, intending to build a tower, does not sit down first and count the cost, whether he has enough to finish it?” (Lk. 14:28-30). But on the other hand, we are warned,

“Come now, you who say, ‘Today or tomorrow we will go to such and such a city, spend a year there, buy and sell, and make a profit;’ whereas you do not know what will happen tomorrow….Instead you ought to say, ‘If the Lord wills, we shall live and do this or that’” (Jas. 4:13-15).

What we can do about what’s ahead, and should do, is pray. Pray for wisdom and daily grace. Pray that we may effectively serve the Lord in the coming year. And hymn writer Frances Havergal has given us a wonderful prayer hymn  on that theme.

CH-1) Another year is dawning, dear Father, let it be
In working or in waiting, another year with Thee.
Another year of progress, another year of praise,
Another year of proving Thy presence all the days.

CH-2) Another year of mercies, of faithfulness and grace,
Another year of gladness in the shining of Thy face;
Another year of leaning upon Thy loving breast;
Another year of trusting, of quiet, happy rest.

CH-3) Another year of service, of witness for Thy love,
Another year of training for holier work above.
Another year is dawning, dear Father, let it be
On earth, or else in heaven, another year for Thee.

Questions:
1) What was the most challenging thing you faced in the past year?

2) What was the greatest blessing you enjoyed in the past year?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (for another article see here)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | January 28, 2019

The Cross Is Not Greater

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Ballington Booth (b. July 28, 1857; d. Oct. 5, 1940)
Music: Ballington Booth

Links:
Wordwise Hymns
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Ballington Booth was the son of Salvation Army founder William Booth. He provided able leadership for the Army in both Australia and, later, America. A biographer describes him is “beloved by all.” When he was involved with leadership training, he was close to the men, not austere and aloof. And on the platform he was an effective speaker, and soloist (accompanying himself on a concertina). The above mentioned biographer describes him as, “a combination of the warm sympathy of his mother and the magnetic personality of his father.”

Booth married Maud Charlesworth, daughter of a clergyman of the Church of England. Later in his career, he had a difference of opinion with his father, and left the army to form The American Volunteers, which he served as General for many years.

The sinking of the RMS Titanic made news around the world, and has since spawned a multitude of articles, books, and movies about the disaster, as well as a successful search for the wreck. Titanic was the largest and most luxurious passenger vessel of its time. Its system of watertight compartments led some to conclude that it was unsinkable. It was not.

Late on April 14th of 1912, about 400 miles off the coast of Newfoundland, the ship struck an iceberg. It was a glancing blow, scraping the side of the ship, underwater. Those in the upper decks felt only a slight momentary shudder. But down below tons of water had begun pouring into the ship–far more than pumps could handle. In less than three hours the great vessel sank, with a loss of more than 1,500 lives.

The ship’s designers were criticized for not having nearly enough lifeboats to accommodate all the passengers. There were only twenty, in part because they could not envision the Titanic would ever sink. Even if there was a major engine failure and the ship couldn’t continue, they could signal other vessels, and passengers could be ferried to them, with the lifeboats going back and forth. That was the theory anyway.

But some problems are bigger than they appear on the surface. That can happen in our daily lives as well. A change in the leadership of a company may, at first, seem to have little affect on employees, only to result, later on, in a major shake-up, or the elimination of many workers. Or a small twinge that takes us to the doctor may seem inconsequential, only to lead to major surgery.

It can happen in a believer’s service for the Lord too. Perhaps we don’t realize the burden some carry in that area. I was standing near a man on a long-ago summer day. Across the road, a local pastor was cutting his lawn. “Huh!” said my companion. “He’s got a pretty easy job. He only works half an hour a week” (thinking, I suppose, of his time in the pulpit Sunday morning). But forty years of my own pastoral ministry have shown how foolish this comment was. At times I’ve felt closer to Paul’s description of his apostleship (II Cor. 11:23-28). And the Lord Jesus spoke several times of the need to take up our cross and follow Him.

“When He had called the people to Himself, with His disciples also, He said to them, ‘Whoever desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me’” (Mk. 8:34).

To “deny himself” means to consistently say no to Self, in terms of selfishness and our own self interest. It’s the other side of the coin to submission to the Lord. And taking up the cross–an instrument of death, symbolizes an identification with Christ, and a determination to do God’s will, whatever the cost.

This is serious business. “Who is sufficient for these things?” asks Paul. And his answer is, “Our sufficiency is from God” (II Cor. 2:16; 3:5). Whether it directly involves some kind of Christian service, or simply the challenges of life we all face, the answer is the same. As the Lord assured the apostle long ago, so He says to each of His children, “My grace is sufficient for you” (II Cor. 12:9; cf. Heb. 4:15-16).

In 1892, Ballington Booth published a gospel song that deals with this subject.

CH-1) The cross that He gave may be heavy,
But it ne’er outweighs His grace;
The storm that I feared may surround me,
But it ne’er excludes His face.

The cross is not greater than His grace,
The storm cannot hide His blessèd face;
I am satisfied to know
That with Jesus here below,
I can conquer every foe.

CH-2) The thorns in my path are not sharper
Than composed His crown for me;
The cup that I drink not more bitter
Than He drank in Gethsemane.

CH-3) The light of His love shineth brighter,
As it falls on paths of woe;
The toil of my work groweth lighter,
As I stoop to raise the low.

Questions:
1) What particular burdens are you carrying today, in your life and your service for Christ?

2) Have you proven the sufficiency of God’s grace in time past? And will you seek His grace today for your need (Heb. 4:14-16)?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | January 24, 2019

All Praise to Thee, My God, This Night

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Thomas Ken (b. July ___, 1637; d. Mar. 19, 1711)
Music: Tallis Canon, by Thomas Tallis (b. circa 1505; d. Nov. 23, 1585)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Thomas Ken) (for another article see here)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: While serving at Winchester Cathedral in 1674, Ken published a Manual of Prayers for Use of the Scholars of Winchester College, which contained several of his hymns. He instructed the students to use them in morning and evening devotions in their rooms. In this he referenced the words of the psalmist:

“It is good to give thanks to the Lord, and to sing praises to Your name, O Most High; to declare Your lovingkindness in the morning, and Your faithfulness every night” (Ps. 92:1-2).

A number of sayings warn us against looking back. Author Rudyard Kipling wrote, humorously, “Never look backwards or you’ll fall down the stairs.” And legendary baseball pitcher Leroy “Satchel” Paige said, “Don’t look back. Something might be gaining on you.”

There’s something to this. If runners in a race look back, they may lose speed, or stumble. And, in life, if we become fixated on the past, it may lead to discouragement over failures, or arrogant pride at successes. But still there can be some value in reviewing the past. George Washington had it right:

“We ought not to look back, unless it is to derive useful lessons from past errors and for the purpose of profiting by dear bought experience.”

With a birthday, or anniversary, or the beginning of a new year, we often look back at what has come before, and set some goals, God willing, for what is to come. The past should not be our obsession or our focus, but it can provide instructive motivation for the future.

When the nation of Israel came to the border of Canaan, the land God had promised them, Moses gave a series of speeches (recorded in Deuteronomy) reviewing the past and challenging them to trust God for what was ahead. He uses the word “remember” many times, recalling their history to that point.

“Remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the Lord your God brought you out from there by a mighty hand” (Deut. 5:15).

“And you shall remember that the Lord your God led you all the way these forty years in the wilderness” (Deut. 8:2).

“Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations. Ask your father, and he will show you; your elders, and they will tell you” (Deut. 32:7).

The New Testament writers follow Moses in calling upon believers to remember certain things.

“Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by so doing some have unwittingly entertained angels” (Heb. 13:2).

“Remember the prisoners as if chained with them–those who are mistreated–since you yourselves are in the body also [i.e. the body of Christ, the church]” (Heb. 13:2, 3).

“Remember the words which were spoken before by the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Jude 1:17).

As to our personal lives, in the evening, it is appropriate for us to look back on the day. Are there mistakes that can be corrected? Are there uncompleted projects that need to be taken up in the morning? This kind of review can be profitable, especially if we talk to the Lord about it, and seek His leading and His enabling grace.

That’s the theme of an evening hymn by Anglican clergyman Thomas Ken. It looks back, looks up to God, and looks forward as well.

CH-1) All praise to Thee, my God, this night,
For all the blessings of the light!
Keep me, O keep me, King of kings,
Beneath Thine own almighty wings.

CH-2) Forgive me, Lord, for Thy dear Son,
The ill that I this day have done,
That with the world, myself, and Thee,
I, ere I sleep, at peace may be.

CH-3) Teach me to live, that I may dread
The grave as little as my bed.
Teach me to die, that so I may
Rise glorious at the judgment day.

CH-4) O may my soul on Thee repose,
And with sweet sleep mine eyelids close,
Sleep that may me more vigorous make
To serve my God when I awake.

Questions:
1) If you were to review your day in the evening, what kinds of things would you take note of?

2) What would you hope to gain by doing such a review?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Thomas Ken) (for another article see here)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | January 21, 2019

The Stranger of Galilee

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Lelia Naylor Morris (b. Apr. 15, 1862; d. July 23, 1929)
Music: Lelia Naylor Morris

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Lelia Morris)
The Cyber Hymnal (Lelia Morris)
Hymnary.org

Note: Lelia Naylor Morris (listed in some song books as Mrs. C. H. Morris) gave us many fine gospel songs, including: Sweeter as the Years Go By; Nearer, Still Nearer; Let Jesus Come into Your Heart; What If It Were Today? and more. The present song seems more of a solo number, but it has a good message.

What do we mean when we label someone a stranger? The term is rooted in a Latin word meaning from outside–speaking of those who are outsiders. We don’t know them, they’re not part of our group. They’re from another locality, aliens or foreigners, possibly even speaking a different language.

If you’ve ever had to move to a new place, perhaps because of your job, you likely have some small idea of what it’s like to be a stranger in town, with no family or friends around to turn to. It can be intimidating to know no one. Where do folks shop for groceries? What about hospitals, doctors, churches, schools, theatres, recreational facilities, and more?

Welcome Wagon International was created to deal with that. The organization was founded in 1928, and it continues to operate in both Canada and the United States. Having adjusted over time to changing demographics and needs, they’ve expanded to offer help to newlyweds, and couples looking forward to the arrival of a baby.

But basically, Welcome Wagon was designed to contact new home owners after they move in, providing a map of the area, a list of significant places in town, and advertisements for local businesses, and sometimes including coupons for bargains, and offering assistance in other ways. Churches often do something similar. They watch for new arrivals in the area around the church, and call on them to introduce the church’s programs, and offer to help in practical ways. With all of this, the strangers in town may soon be strangers no more.

In the Bible, some form of the word stranger is used more than a hundred times. The Lord appeared to Abraham when he lived in the city of Ur, in Mesopotamia, telling he to go to a new land he’d never seen before. And God made a covenant with Abraham, part of which included the land of Canaan.

“I give to you and your descendants after you the land in which you are a stranger [or foreigner], all the land of Canaan, as an everlasting possession” (Gen. 17:8).

Then through a series of circumstances described in the latter part of Genesis, and the beginning of Exodus, the descendants of Abraham (the Israelites) ended up in cruel bondage in the land of Egypt. The Lord used Moses to lead them out of slavery, and later Joshua brought them into the land God had promised them.

This experience was expected to give them concern and compassion for those who were strangers in their midst. God told them, “You shall neither mistreat a stranger nor oppress him, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt” (Exod. 22:21). And the Bible assures us, “The Lord watches over the strangers” (Ps. 146:9).

In the New Testament, when the Lord Jesus came on the scene, He was a stranger to many, and they had no idea of His true identity. They saw His miraculous power, heard His dynamic teaching, and wondered. There’s a phrase repeated in the Gospels that highlights the widespread puzzlement: “Who is this?” When the Lord healed a man, and also forgave his sins, the outraged Jewish leaders questioned, “Who is this who speaks blasphemies? Who can forgive sins but God alone?” (Lk. 5:21; cf. 7:49; 9:9)

The question stirred up the whole city of Jerusalem, when the Lord made His Triumphal Entry, fulfilling a prophecy identifying Him as Israel’s Messiah (Zech. 9:9).

“When He had come into Jerusalem, all the city was moved, saying, ‘Who is this?’” (Matt. 21:10).

But when faith reaches out to Him, the Spirit of God gives new insight, warms our hearts toward Him, and He’s a stranger no more. That’s the thrust of a gospel song called The Stranger of Galilee, written by Lelia Morris.

1) In fancy I stood by the shore, one day,
Of the beautiful murm’ring sea;
I saw the great crowds as they thronged the way
Of the Stranger of Galilee;
I saw how the man who was blind from birth,
In a moment was made to see;
The lame was made whole by the matchless skill
Of the Stranger of Galilee.

And I felt I could love Him forever,
So gracious and tender was He!
I claimed Him that day as my Saviour,
This Stranger of Galilee.

2) His look of compassion, His words of love,
They shall never forgotten be,
When sin-sick and helpless He saw me there,
This Stranger of Galilee;
He showed me his hand and His riven side,
And He whispered, ‘It was for thee!”
My burden fell off at the piercèd feet
Of the Stranger of Galilee.

Questions:
1) If Christ is not a Stranger, but our Saviour and Lord, and Friend, what differences should this make in our lives?

2) Do you know someone who recently trusted Christ as Saviour? What is their testimony about the changes this has brought?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Lelia Morris)
The Cyber Hymnal (Lelia Morris)
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | January 17, 2019

All Will Be Well

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Mary Bowly Peters (b. _____, 1813; d. July 29, 1856)
Music: Ar Hyd Y Nos (meaning all through the night) , a traditional Welsh tune dating from well before 1784. To it we sing an English version of All Through the Night.

Links:
Wordwise Hymns
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Mary Peters, was the wife of an Anglican clergyman. With her writings, Mary Peters also contributed hymns to publications of the Plymouth Brethren. the present hymn is sometimes known by its first line, Through the Love of God Our Saviour.

A bountiful harvest is a beautiful sight to see. Whether it’s a field of golden grain, or an orchard with fruit-laden trees, or row on row of vines heavy with grapes, it delights those who’ve laboured long to produce it, and will bless all who’ll receive it.

On Thanksgiving Sunday, many churches have decorations that put the fruits of the field on display. Entering the building and being greeted with the aroma of freshly picked apples, or grapes, brings a smile. The display is a reminder of the multiplied blessings of God, to whom we raise songs of thanksgiving.

There’s something that could well be added to those tokens of blessing, but I’ve never seen it done. I’m referring to a hymn book, which contains a rich treasury that has blessed the church for centuries. Most hymnals have from six to eight hundred songs. Not all are outstanding poetry, but some are. Not all express a depth of biblical truth, but some certainly do. Together, they provide for God’s people a vehicle for united praise and prayer, teaching and testimony.

Some of our hymns and gospel songs focus on one main idea, exploring its implications and emphasizing that single point. But there are others so rich that nearly every line adds another significant Bible-based truth. Hymns such as: How Firm a Foundation; Peace, Perfect Peace; More Holiness Give Me; and, At Even, When the Sun Was Set, are examples of this. They can be read, as well as sung, and make a worthy resource for personal meditation and prayer.

A lesser known hymn like that is All Will Be Well, published in 1847. It makes me think of the cluster of grapes cut down by the Israelite spies sent into Canaan. The Bible says it was so big “they carried it between two of them on a pole” (Num. 13:23). That’s a lot of fruit! And there’s so much of heaven’s bounty, in Mrs. Peters’ hymn it would take several articles to explore it fully.

Consider a few things, with related Scripture texts.

¤ Mentioned a couple of times is the love of God. The Bible tells us this is a fundamental characteristic of His (I Jn. 4:8), and His love for us is both a saving and keeping love (Jn. 3:16; Rom. 8:39).

¤ “Free and changeless is His favour” celebrates the boundless grace of God (Eph. 2:4-7).

¤ We learn too about the power of the shed blood of Christ (Eph. 1:7).

And we have the sealing of God’s Spirit (i.e. the presence of the Spirit of God in the believer is God’s seal of ownership and guarantee of our future, Eph. 1:13-14).

¤ The hymn reminds us the Lord will defend and protect us (Heb. 13:5-6).

¤ And bring us through times of tribulation, giving songs even in sorrow and pain (Job 35:10; Acts 16:23-25).

¤ He watches over us, and meets our needs in life and in death (Phil. 1:21), providing what Mary Peters calls “a full salvation” (Heb. 7:25).

¤ We have available the guidance of the Holy Spirit (Rom. 8:14), and God’s provision for our needs, through Christ (Phil. 4:19)

¤ We can be happy and content in prayer (Phil. 4:6-7), and fruitful in service for the Lord (Jn. 15:5, 16).

CH-1) Through the love of God our Saviour,
All will be well;
Free and changeless is His favour;
All, all is well.
Precious is the blood that healed us;
Perfect is the grace that sealed us;
Strong the hand stretched out to shield us;
All must be well.

CH-2) Though we pass through tribulation,
All will be well;
Ours is such a full salvation;
All, all is well.
Happy still in God confiding,
Fruitful, if in Christ abiding,
Holy through the Spirit’s guiding,
All must be well.

CH-3) We expect a bright tomorrow;
All will be well;
Faith can sing through days of sorrow,
All, all is well.
On our Father’s love relying,
Jesus every need supplying,
Or in living, or in dying,
All must be well.

Questions:
1) Which of the blessings the hymn deals with mean the most to you just now?

2) If you were writing the hymn, what other blessings would you include?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | January 14, 2019

Nothing Satisfies but Jesus

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Lelia Naylor Morris (b. Apr. 15, 1862; d. July 23, 1929)
Music: Lelia Naylor Morris

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Lelia Morris)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Ohio church organist and hymn writer Lelia Naylor gave us many fine songs. In 1881 she married Charles Hammond Morris. This is the reason in some song books she is called Mrs. C. H. Morris.

It’s frustrating to make a purchase, then find that the product isn’t what we needed, or doesn’t work as promised. But our annoyance may be compounded when we learn from the seller “there are no returns” on the product.

On the other hand, it’s encouraging when we’re told, before putting out the money, that the store or company policy is “Satisfaction guaranteed.” Essentially, this is a promise that, if the customer isn’t satisfied, the item can be returned and a full refund will be given.

Beyond the issue of who bears the responsibility, an important factor of public relations (“P. R.”) is involved. What will the customers tell their friends? And how will this affect the business’s bottom line later on? In the first instance, we may warn others not to do business there. In the second, we more likely will tell our friends how fair and helpful they’ve been to us.

Some larger companies, restaurant chains, car dealerships, and so on, have a whole department responsible for public relations. Their job is listening to customers, and communicating with everyone about what they have to offer, and how concerned they are that customers are happy with their product or service. We see television commercials along that line. They may even include actual customers telling us how well the company treated them, and how satisfied they are with their purchase.

The Bible uses various forms of the word “satisfied” many times. Sometimes, it points to what is not satisfying, particularly because its benefits aren’t lasting. But also, human nature being what it is, we can often become dis-satisfied with the things of this life. All we want is more. “The eye is not satisfied with seeing, nor the ear filled with hearing” (Ecc. 1:8). “He who loves silver will not be satisfied with silver; nor he who loves abundance, with increase. This also is vanity” (Ecc. 5:10).

But more often the biblical theme is a positive one–about the soul satisfaction found in God, and of the abundance of blessings in and through Him.

“For He satisfies the longing soul, and fills the hungry soul with goodness” (Ps. 107:9).

“You open Your hand and satisfy the desire of every living thing” (Ps. 145:16).

“I will bless You while I live…my soul shall be satisfied as with marrow and fatness, and my mouth shall praise You with joyful lips” (Ps. 63:405).

“Oh, satisfy us early with Your mercy, that we may rejoice and be glad all our days!” (Ps. 90:14).

The Lord Jesus said, “I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly” (Jn. 10:10).

“[God] is able to do exceedingly abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that works in us” (Eph. 3:20).

“He saved us, through the washing of regeneration and renewing of the Holy Spirit, whom He poured out on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour” (Tit. 3:5-6).

And “God is able to make all grace abound toward you, that you, always having all sufficiency in all things, may have an abundance for every good work” (II Cor. 9:8).

“Jesus said to them, ‘I am the bread of life. He who comes to Me shall never hunger, and he who believes in Me shall never thirst’” (Jn. 6:35).

All of this raises the question: Why do so many insist on looking elsewhere to find fulfilment and satisfaction in life? “Why do you spend money for what is not bread, and your wages for what does not satisfy?…Incline your ear, and come to Me. Hear, and your soul shall live” (Isa. 55:2-3). In spiritual and eternal terms, abundant satisfaction is found in and through the Lord Jesus Christ, and Him alone.

Published in 1905 is a song by Lelia Morris called Nothing Satisfies but Jesus. It expresses the truths discussed above.

CH-1) Nothing satisfies but Jesus,
Bread of life to mortals giv’n;
May His presence now refresh us
Like the morning dew from heav’n!

Give me Jesus, give me Jesus;
Take the world, but give me Jesus;
To satisfy with every blessing,
His love and peace my soul possessing;
To all beside my heart replies:
There’s naught but Jesus satisfies!

CH-2) Since I heard the voice of Jesus,
Since mine eyes beheld the King,
All my love, my heart’s affection,
All I have to Him I bring.

CH-3) With His joy my heart is thrilling,
All my hope in Him I see;
Doubt and gloom and fear dispelling,
Christ is all in all to me!

Questions:
1) What are some of the areas in which Christ brings satisfaction beyond what the world can offer?

2) What are some reasons many search for satisfaction elsewhere?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Lelia Morris)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

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