Posted by: rcottrill | December 7, 2016

How Weak the Thoughts and Vain

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Charles Wesley (b. Dec. 18, 1707; d. Mar. 29, 1788)
Music: Calvary, by T. Turvey (no other data available)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Charles Wesley)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Usually, we think of John Wesley as the preacher, and his brother Charles as the hymn writer. While that was often true, Charles was a fine preacher too, and John occasionally wrote or translated hymns. The present hymn is not on the superlative level of Jesus, Lover of My Soul, or Hark, the Herald Angels Sing, but it fit the situation that inspired it well.

Earthquakes are fearful things. And apart from the injury, death and destruction caused, the experience of the event can be a nightmare. When planet earth itself seems to turn against its inhabitants, when there’s no secure place to stand, when those around us panic and run, it brings a helpless panic beyond comprehension.

Occasional quakes occur here in Canada’s prairie provinces, but we’ve so far escaped the ones of greater force that strike the west coast. When it’s a sudden brief jarring some may not even notice, a seismic shudder that cracks no wall and breaks no crockery, that’s far from the upheaval some have endured.

In China, in January of 1556, the deadliest earthquake of all time struck. The magnitude 8.0 quake killed 830,000, which was 60% of the population of that area. In May of 1960, the world’s most powerful quake occurred in Chile. Six thousand deaths were reported, and the magnitude 9.5 shock at the epicentre was equal to a thousand atom bombs all being exploded at once!

Psalm 46 assures us of the help of God, as it describes an earthly upheaval that sounds very much like an earthquake.

“God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore we will not fear, even though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea” (Ps. 46:1-2).

That passage was brought to the mind of hymn writer Charles Wesley by what happened in London in 1750. A powerful earthquake struck the city on February 8th, causing widespread alarm. But it was followed by an even more devastating quake on March 8th. People ran into the streets in terror, not knowing where to turn. To make matters even worse, and spread further panic, a deranged soldier predicted the entire city would be swallowed up on April 4th.

It was on March 8th, at 5:15 a.m. that Charles Wesley stood to preach at the Foundry Meeting House, when the building was suddenly shaken so violently that all in attendance feared the roof was about to fall on their heads. Women screamed, children began to cry. Wesley had just given out the text of his sermon, but he quickly calmed the congregation, changed his text, and preached on Psalm 46:2, quoted above.

Charles Wesley’s ability to handle a chaotic situation, and instantly switch to a text appropriate to it, illustrates how amazingly the Lord had gifted these men. And times have certainly changed. I wonder how many families today, parents and children, would attend a church service at five o’clock in the morning!

The alarm of the people of London provided the Wesleys with some wonderful opportunities to preach the gospel, calling on sinners to get right with God. Charles preached one sermon with the intriguing title, “The Cause and Cure of Earthquakes.” He also wrote some nineteen hymns during those days, with stern reminders of the frail and passing nature of this life, and the need to prepare for eternity. One of these was How Weak the Thoughts and Vain. See how he makes use of the earthquakes to deliver a powerful message.

CH-1) How weak the thoughts, and vain,
Of self-deluding men!
Men who, fixed to earth alone,
Think their houses shall endure,
Fondly call their lands their own,
To their distant heirs secure.

CH-2) How happy then are we,
Who build, O Lord, on Thee;
What can our foundation shock?
Though the shattered earth remove,
Stands our city on a rock,
On the Rock of heavenly love.

Turning from the trembling earth, Charles Wesley pointed to the security of our heavenly home being prepared by Christ (Jn. 14:2-3).

CH-3) A house we call our own
Which cannot be o’erthrown;
In the general ruin sure,
Storms and earthquakes it defies;
Built immovably secure,
Built eternal in the skies.

Questions:
1) Have you ever been in a frightening situation such as an earthquake? How did you handle it? (Did your faith in God make a difference?)

2) How would you advise a person to prepare spiritually for an unexpected catastrophic event?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Charles Wesley)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | December 5, 2016

Hear My Prayer, O Heavenly Father

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Harriet Parr (b. Jan. 31, 1828; d. Feb. 18, 1900)
Music: Springhill, by William Flavel Hurndall (b. _____, 1830; d. _____, 1888)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: If you wish to use this hymn and the tune is not known, try Wycliff, by John Stainer (used in some hymnals with All for Jesus), or Evening Prayer, by George Stebbins (used with Saviour, Breathe an Evening Blessing).

There are some things that are appropriate on one occasion, but not on another. To yell, “Fire!” in a crowded building, just for the fun of seeing people panic and run in all directions, may get you thrown in jail. But to yell, “Fire!” as a warning to others, when there is indeed a fire, could win you a medal.

On the other hand, one of things that would seem to fit all occasions is prayer. You can pray, sitting comfortably in your favourite chair at home. Children at bedtime can pray. Drivers can pray in the car, as they travel–providing they keep their eyes open! Labourers can pray on the job, patients can pray in the hospital, prisoners can pray in a jail, and shipwrecked travelers on the open ocean can pray. Anywhere and everywhere, it’s a good thing to look to God, in faith.

Missionaries Paul and Silas prayed in a Roman prison (Acts 16:25). And one of the most unusual venues for prayer is found in the book of Jonah. The prophet Jonah reached out to God in prayer from the belly of the great sea monster that had swallowed him. “Salvation is of the Lord [deliverance comes from God],” he said (Jon. 2:9)–which is, incidentally a major theme of the Bible. Jonah could say, with the psalmist, “Out of the depths I have cried to You, O Lord (Ps. 130. 1). And so can we.

From 1850 to 1859, Charles Dickens published a weekly magazine called Household Words, containing stories by himself and many other authors. One of those whose stories he used three times was the popular Victorian novelist Harriet Parr (1828-1900). The Christmas 1856 edition of the periodical contained Parr’s story The Wreck of the Golden Mary. And it’s this tale that gave us the only hymn Miss Parr ever wrote–a hymn about prayer.

In the story, the Golden Mary set sail on a voyage to California, but struck an iceberg and soon went down. Passengers took to the life boats, and spent several days floating on the frigid sea, until they were rescued. To fill the time of anxious waiting, they each told stories about themselves and their experiences.

One of them, a young man named Dick Tarrant, reminisced about his childhood. “There’s a child’s hymn,” he said, “I and Tom used to say at my mother’s knee, when we were little ones….If I were ever afraid, as boys will be after reading a good ghost story, I would keep on saying it till I fell asleep….It is as clear in my mind at this minute as if my mother was here listening to me. When the others asked to hear the hymn, he shared it with them.

Three years after its publication in the story about the Golden Mary, the fictional Tom’s remembered hymn was included in a hymnal. Like the hymn Jesus Loves Me, it first appeared in a make believe story, and since its worth was recognized it has appeared in many hymn books since.

Sometimes it’s rendered as “Hear our prayer, O heavenly Father…” though I think the singular pronoun “my” makes the hymn stronger because it’s more direct and personal. We are each one to “Seek the Lord while He may be found” (Isa. 55:6).

In any event, here is some of Harriet Parr’s 1856 hymn.

CH-1) Hear my prayer, O heavenly Father,
Ere I lay me down to sleep;
Bid Thine angels, pure and holy,
Round my bed their vigil keep.

CH-2) Great my sins are, but Thy mercy
Far outweighs them every one;
Down before the cross I cast them,
Trusting in Thy help alone.

CH-4) None shall measure out Thy patience,
By the span of human thought;
None shall bound the tender mercies
Which Thy holy Son has wrought.

CH-5) Pardon all my past transgressions,
Give me strength for days to come,
Guide and guard me with Thy blessing,
Till Thine angels bid me home.

Questions:
1) Where is the most unusual place, or what is the most unusual circumstance, in which you have prayed?

2) What do you think the Bible means when it says, “Pray without ceasing” (I Thess. 5:17)?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | December 2, 2016

Have You on the Lord Believed?

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Philip Paul Bliss (b. July 9, 1838; d. Dec. 29, 1876)
Music: Philip Paul Bliss

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Philip Bliss)
They Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Philip Paul Bliss remains one of the great American gospel song writers of the nineteenth century. This is so, even though his output was not as great as some others, and even though his life was cut short by a terrible train accident, when he was only thirty-eight. Hymn books still contain a number of his songs: Hallelujah, What a Saviour; Wonderful Words of Life; I Will Sing of My Redeemer; and more. Songs such as Hold the Fort, and Let the Lower Lights Be Burning, were inspired by unusual events in the news, as was a lesser known song of Bliss’s called Have You on the Lord Believed?

Television pitch men do it all the time. They’ll rave about how wonderful their product is–the latest kitchen gizmo, or some gunk to stop leaks–and after we’re utterly astonished at what a great thing it is, and how little it costs, they add, “But there’s more!” Apparently they’re in a mood to be generous, and feel led to throw in some extras.

“Buy our blender, and we’ll also send you this incredible set of kitchen knives.” Or, “Hurry! Phone within the next twenty minutes and we’ll double your order for our fabulous furniture scratch remover at no extra cost.”

Is it as good as they say it is? It’s often helpful to go Online and check out comments from those who’ve already purchased whatever it is. That can be revealing–and save us from wasting our money. And, think about it: selling two for the price of one suggests the product is actually worth less than half of what they’re charging. They may well not be as generous as they want us to believe.

Aren’t you glad the Lord has infinitely more integrity than a blathering salesman? He is “a God of truth and without injustice; righteous and upright is He” (Deut. 32:4). We can count on His promises. He is a God of abundant grace (I Tim. 1:14), abundant mercy (Ps. 86:5, 15; I Pet. 1:3), offering an abundant pardon to sinners (Isa. 55:7). He is the Source of abundant life (Jn. 10:10), and of abundant satisfaction (Ps. 36:8).

But there’s more. Unimaginably more.

Christians discover, and will yet discover, that God “is able to do exceedingly abundantly above all that we ask or think” (Eph. 3:20). His gifts are beyond human prayers or even human imagination, partly because they extend beyond this present time into an endless eternity of multiplied blessings.

Through faith we have a new standing in Christ. We are counted as “joint heirs with Christ” (Rom. 8:17; cf. Gal. 4:7), and have an imperishable inheritance reserved for us in heaven (I Pet. 1:4). The Lord has “raised us up together, and made us sit together in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, that in the ages to come He might show the exceeding riches of His grace in His kindness toward us in Christ Jesus” (Eph. 2:6-7).

The story behind Have You on the Lord Believed is this. Long ago, a great fortune was inherited by a very poor man. But instead of giving him the legacy directly, lawyers entrusted it to the man’s pastor to distribute at his discretion. Knowing the man, and being aware of how sometimes sudden wealth can be squandered frivolously, the pastor decided to give the fortune to the man in small amounts. In the envelope with each payment was a note saying, “This is thine; use it wisely. There is more to follow.” In telling of this, evangelist Dwight Moody concluded, “Brethren, that’s just the way God deals with us.”

Thinking of the story and what Mr. Moody said, Bliss wrote the song:

CH-1) Have you on the Lord believed?
Still there’s more to follow.
Of His grace have you received?
Still there’s more to follow.
Oh, the grace the Father shows!
Still there’s more to follow.
Freely He His grace bestows,
Still there’s more to follow.

More and more, more and more,
Always more to follow,
Oh, his matchless, boundless love!
Still there’s more to follow.

CH-3) Have you felt the Spirit’s power?
Still there’s more to follow.
Falling like the gentle shower?
Still there’s more to follow.
Oh, the power the Spirit shows,
Still there’s more to follow.
Freely He His power bestows,
Still there’s more to follow.

Questions:
1) What blessing have you received from the Lord that keeps enriching you more and more?

2) What does it mean to “lay up treasures in heaven” (Matt. 6:20)? And what kind of riches is the Lord talking about?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Philip Bliss)
They Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | November 30, 2016

Are You Counting the Cost?

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Ina Mae Duley Ogdon (b. Apr. 3, 1872; d. May 18, 1964)
Music: Bentley DeForest Ackley (b. Sept. 27, 1872; Sept. 3, 1958)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Ina Ogdon)
The Cyber Hymnal (Ina Ogdon)
Hymnary.org

Note: Mrs. Ogdon was an Illinois school teacher, who also wrote many gospel songs, including the popular Brighten the Corner Where You Are. Charles Gabriel wrote the tune for this song, as he did for many of Ogdon’s others. Of the authoress, Mr. Gabriel writes:

“The object of every song seems to have been the winning of souls. Loved by thousands who have sung her hymns, she shrinks from celebrity in the knowledge that her songs are God-given, and that without Him she could do nothing.”

Frank Heneage relayed the following account to Homer Rodeheaver, Billy Sunday’s song leader, and Rodeheaver relates it in some length in his book, Song Stories of the Sawdust Trail (published by Moffat, Yard and Company, 1917). I’ve compressed his eighteen pages to fit this short treatment.

We enjoy pleasant stories, stories that end well, when “they lived happily ever after.” Though even some of those had a dark side. An early version of the fairy tale Cinderella had the ugly step-sisters stuffed in barrels full of nails and rolled down into the sea!

But in real life, there are times when the conclusion isn’t happy at all. Times when the account ends in heartbreaking tragedy and loss. We are gripped by such stories, as we see how the path to destruction is strewn with foolish choices.

There is a term for this kind of narrative. It’s called a cautionary tale, a story in which something bad happens that can be used as a warning for the future. Someone disregards the warning signs, or acts in a foolish or forbidden way, resulting in disaster. It’s to be hoped we learn a lesson from it.

Something like that happened to Jim Tarleton, early in the twentieth century. Here is his cautionary tale.

Jim was an intelligent young man who made good grades in university. But he came to New York City with one thing on his mind: having a good time. He had about a hundred thousand dollars in the bank–worth three or four million in buying power today. Intelligent, wealthy, but not wise. As Jesus said:

“What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul? Or what will a man give in exchange for his soul?” (Mk. 8:36-37).

Tarleton rented a lavish apartment for himself and his pal, Al Cummings, and they started on a spending spree. Three or four times a week, they threw parties. Lots of girls, the best wines, Broadway shows, the works. This went on for a little over two years, then the crash came.

Jim was shocked when, for the first time, one of his cheques bounced. For awhile, his credit remained good, and he borrowed money. But the bills kept on piling up. When there were no more good times, Al walked out on him. Shortly after that, the landlord asked Jim Tarleton to move out, too.

He sold his good clothes to buy food, but soon that resource failed as well. As he spiraled downward, he found himself living in a bare room with a cot and one rickety chair, shaking with an illness that would eventually take his life. Jim wandered the streets, selling cheap calendars to anyone who would have pity on him.

One day he came across Frank Heneage, a businessman who had known him in his big spending days. Heneage was shocked to see the ragged, shaking, wasted figure before him. He found Jim a decent place to stay, paid the rent himself, and got him some decent food. Then he took Jim to a meeting of evangelist Billy Sunday.

Though Jim did not make a decision for Christ, one song, written by Ina Ogdon, was sung at the meeting that made a deep impression on him. The refrain asked:

Are you counting the cost, are you counting the cost?
When your Lord you refuse are you counting the cost?
Do you know without Jesus your soul will be lost?
When your Lord you refuse are you counting the cost?

Frank took Jim back to his room, promising to look for a job for him, which he did. But in his weakening condition, Jim couldn’t handle even the easy duties. He was fired. The next Frank knew, his friend was taken to the hospital, and he got a call saying Jim was in critical condition. When he arrived, and realized the end was near, Frank asked permission to stay with him through the night.

During those long hours of suffering, Jim kept mumbling, over and over, the words of the song that had stuck in his mind:

4) For what shall it profit you there, though you gain
The wealth of the world as a whole”
O shall not your labour be worse than in vain
If thereby you lose your own soul?

Are you counting the cost, are you counting the cost?
When your Lord you refuse are you counting the cost?
Do you know without Jesus your soul will be lost?
When your Lord you refuse are you counting the cost?

As cold death tightened its grip on the man, his last words to Frank were, “I…I guess I have found the cost…after all, old man.”

Questions:
1) Is there someone you know on a similar road to ruin as Jim Tarleton took? What are you doing to attempt to rescue him or her?

2) Do you know someone whose life was turned around, through Christ and the gospel?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Ina Ogdon)
The Cyber Hymnal (Ina Ogdon)
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | November 28, 2016

We’ll Work Till Jesus Comes

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Elizabeth King Mills (b. _____, 1805; d. Apr. 21, 1829)
Music: William Miller (no data available)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Elizabeth King Mills was the wife of a British member of parliament. The fact that she died at the age of twenty-four suggests that she may have been a relatively new bride. She gave us several hymns, including the present one in which she sighs for her heavenly home. A publication of the hymn a few years after Mrs. Mills’s death, includes several darker stanzas that seem to show her extremes of suffering.

No tranquil joys on earth I know,
No peaceful shelt’ring dome;
This world’s a wilderness of woe–
This world is not my home.

When by affliction sharply tried,
I view the gaping tomb;
Although I dread death’s chilling tide,
Yet still I sigh for home.

The dictionary defines work as: “exertion or effort directed to produce or accomplish something.” And work is a fact of life. Whether it’s ploughing a field, baking bread, programing a computer, or performing surgery, we all do work of some kind.

It’s not surprising that we have many sayings that relate to the subject. “Make hay while the sun shines,” we say. And, “All work and no play make Jack a dull boy”–that one comes from more than three centuries ago. “Another day another dollar” seems to have been adapted from a saying by sailors in the nineteenth century: “More days, more dollars.” Then, there are sterner admonitions, such as: “Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.” Or, “no pain, no gain.”

Notice the two components of the definition given earlier There is effort, and there is a goal. And perhaps, in addition, there is an implied point where our labours are expected to end with the achievement of the goal.

As to the effort involved, we try to measure the efficiency of it. Is time and effort well spent with relation to the proposed result? Or are resources being squandered? And when it comes to the goal, we have certain expectations that will measure success and productivity, as we look back on what has been done.

In the Bible, much is said about work, especially in the book of Proverbs. “He who is slothful in his work is a brother to him who is a great destroyer” (18:9). “Do you see a man who excels in his work? He will stand before kings” (22:29). Or this about priorities: “Prepare your outside work, make it fit for yourself in the field; and afterward build your house” (24:27). And about Solomon’s ideal woman: “Give her of the fruit of her hands, and let her own works praise her in the gates” (31:31).

In the New Testament, the focus on works is intensified. Our Christian faith is to be far more than an intellectual exercise. “Faith without works is dead” (Jas. 2:20; cf. Tit. 1:16). If our trust in God is genuine, it will be reflected in our life and service for Him. We will be “zealous for good works” (Tit. 2:14), also encouraging such conduct in others. “Let us consider one another in order to stir up love and good works” (Heb. 10:24).

One responsibility believers have is the work of edifying, or building up, the church (Eph. 4:11-12). Witnessing for Christ and sharing the gospel (evangelism) is another central task given to us (II Tim. 4:5). “We then, as workers together with Him also plead with you not to receive the grace of God in vain” (II Cor. 6:1). “We therefore ought to receive such [servants of Christ], that we may become fellow workers for the truth” (III Jn. 1:8). This is what is called “fellowship in the gospel” (Phil. 1:5).

We are equipped for this dual ministry (edification and evangelism) by the teaching of the Word (II Tim. 2:15; 3:16-17). And the Lord exhorts us to keep at it, with the assurance that it is not futile. “Be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your labour is not in vain in the Lord” (I Cor. 15:58). In the end, may our testimony be, as it was for the Lord Jesus, “I have glorified You on the earth. I have finished the work which You have given Me to do” (Jn. 17:4; cf. 9:4).

Among Mrs. Mills’s hymns is this simply one that challenges us to keep serving the Lord, with heaven in view.

CH-1) O land of rest, for thee I sigh!
When will the moment come
When I shall lay my armour by
And dwell in peace at home?

We’ll work till Jesus comes,
We’ll work till Jesus comes,
We’ll work till Jesus comes,
And we’ll be gathered home.

3) I sought at once my Saviour’s side;
No more my steps shall roam.
With Him I’ll brave death’s chilling tide
And reach my heav’nly home.

Questions:
1) Are you, or is someone you know, suffering in the way Mrs. Mills seems to have done?

2) What has been a comfort and help in this time? (Or what can you share with the other sufferer to be of help?)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | November 25, 2016

Saved by the Blood

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: S. J. Henderson (no data available)
Music: Daniel Brink Towner (b. Apr. 5, 1850; d. Oct. 3, 1919).

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Daniel Towner)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Understandably, many of our hymns and gospel songs speak of salvation and getting saved. It’s central to the Christian message. Saved by Grace, Jesus Saves, and many more are found in evangelical hymnals. The present song was written around 1902 by S. J. Henderson–and we know no more about him than his name.

We do, however, know quite a bit about Daniel Towner. He was Director of Music at Moody Bible Institute, in Chicago, 1893-1919. Given that, and the time when the song was published, it’s possible that Mr. Henderson was one of his students at the Institute.

For candy lovers it’s a problem. On a hot day, chocolate melts easily, and can be messy to eat. To the rescue came American candy maker Clarence Crane. In 1912 he invented a “summer candy” that could withstand the heat. The now familiar ring-shaped treats were dubbed Life Savers, because they looked like the life preservers used in water rescue.

The problem solved by Mr. Crane was a relatively minor one. But more than thirty years ago, the St. John Ambulance organization started presenting annual awards in Canada to those who have rescued other human beings. A gold award “recognizes individuals, or groups of individuals, who have saved or attempted to save a life through the administration of first aid knowledge and skills, where a degree of risk to life exists [for the rescuer].” A silver award is given when the rescuer’s life was not deemed to be in danger.

When we turn to the Bible, a great deal is said about life saving. There we find the words “save” and “saved” used over two hundred and fifty times, and “salvation” an added one hundred and fifty times or so.

Sometimes what is spoken of is a physical rescue. Joseph tells his brothers that the Lord brought him to Egypt to save their lives–by a grain conservation program that provided food in a time of famine (Gen. 45:7). God “saved” the lives of Noah and his family in the ark (II Pet. 2:5), and “saved” the people of Israel from slavery in Egypt (Jude 1:5).

More often, however, it’s a spiritual rescue that is in view. The salvation spoken of in God’s Word is a rescue from the danger of eternal ruin. Individual are delivered, preserved, and guaranteed an eternal future of endless blessing with the Lord.

The problem that threatens our future is sin. The Bible is quite clear that “all have sinned” (Rom. 3:23), and that “the wages of sin is death” (Rom. 6:23). But God the Son came to this earth, as Man, to die in the sinner’s place. “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life” (Jn. 3:16). That is the Christian gospel–the good news.

The Scriptures testify that “the Father has sent the Son as Saviour of the world” (I Jn. 4:19), and the title “Saviour” is given to Christ many times. He is “our great God and Saviour Jesus Christ” (Tit. 2:13). “This is a faithful saying and worthy of all acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (I Tim. 1:15). “We shall be saved from wrath through Him” (Rom. 5:9).

And He not only died, but rose again, Conqueror over death. Now seated at the Father’s right hand, “He is also able to save to the uttermost [completely and forever] those who come to God through Him, since He always lives to make intercession for them” (Heb. 7:25).

God’s salvation is not a wage we earn by being born to Christian parents, or by doing good works, or submitting to church rituals at the right church. It’s a gift of God, paid for already by Christ on the cross (Rom. 6:23). As Paul writes to the Ephesian Christians, “By grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast” (Eph. 2:8-9). And, “We have redemption through His blood” (Eph. 1:7).

Mr. Henderson’s song is very repetitious–twelve times in the stanzas and repeated refrains, it repeats something of critical importance, reminding us we are saved by the blood of Christ.

CH-1) Saved by the blood of the Crucified One!
Now ransomed from sin and a new work begun,
Sing praise to the Father and praise to the Son,
Saved by the blood of the Crucified One!

Saved! Saved!
My sins are all pardoned, my guilt is all gone!
Saved! Saved !
I am saved by the blood of the Crucified One!

CH-3) Saved by the blood of the Crucified One!
The Father He spoke, and His will it was done;
Great price of my pardon, His own precious Son;
Saved by the blood of the Crucified One!

Questions:
1) Can you remember when you trusted Christ as your personal Saviour?

2) How does God’s salvation affect your day to day life?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Daniel Towner)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | November 23, 2016

Oft in Sorrow

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Henry Kirke White (b. Mar. 21, 1785; d. Oct. 19, 1806); found after the author’s death and revised by Frances Sara Fuller-Maitland Colquhoun when she was fourteen years old (b. June 20, 1809; May 27, 1877)
Music: Eighmey, by William Henry Pontius (b. Mar. 3, 1844; d. June 11, 1908)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Note: Henry Kirke White was an English poet. Following his conversion to Christ, he enrolled in pastoral studies, but didn’t complete them. He took ill, and died at the age of twenty-one. He has left us the present hymn that alludes to the sacrifices required if we are to be victorious in the spiritual battle all Christians face.

Warfare should never be glamorized. It’s a terrible thing. But, over the centuries, elevated prose and glowing lines of verse too often have been employed to glorify human conflict. It’s described as a heroic enterprise, a grand adventure, and a noble calling.

While there may be elements of truth in this, wars are lived out in scenes of grim death and unparalleled human suffering. New engines of war and more devastating explosives, developed to insure victory, also have served up more death and destruction on both sides.

For Americans, it was the Civil War that brought people face to face with reality. General Sherman put it bluntly: “War is hell!” For many in Europe, and in Canada too, it was the First World War that drove home the shock of the endless brutality and human carnage involved. That we’re justified in fighting to preserve our freedom, or to end human tyranny and oppression, should never blind us to the painful sacrifices needed to do so.

But we must turn to the Bible to learn about another war that’s been going on, invisible to human eyes, since before time began. It’s a conflict in the spirit realm, encompassing the earth, a war in which dark powers are allied against a holy God and all His works. It began when a powerful angel named Lucifer coveted the throne of God, saying to himself:

“I will exalt my throne above the stars of God…I will ascend above the heights of the clouds, I will be like the Most High” (Isa. 14:12-15).

Cast out of heaven, he carried some other angels with him. Together they became a demon army prosecuting Satan’s long war against God. As the Scriptures put it:

“We are not wrestling with flesh and blood [contending only with physical opponents], but against the despotisms, against the powers, against [the master spirits who are] the world rulers of this present darkness, against the spirit forces of wickedness in the heavenly (supernatural) sphere” (Eph. 6:12, Amplified Bible).

Though we find the devil at work in the Old Testament, early on, in Eden and in other places, it’s with the coming of Christ that he and his dark powers seem to become especially active. His temptation of the Lord Jesus is described in Matthew 4:1-11, as well as in Mark and Luke. And, failing to keep the Saviour from fulfilling His mission back then, He continues his assault on the people of God to this day.

We are warned, “Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil walks about like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour” (I Pet. 5:8). We face a powerful foe, but we are also armed by the Lord for the battle. “Be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might. Put on the whole armour of God [described in vs. 14-17], that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil” (Eph. 6:10-11).

Though we are assured of final victory (Rev. 20:10), we’re counseled about the need for all out commitment to the struggle. “You therefore must endure hardship as a good soldier of Jesus Christ. No one engaged in warfare entangles himself with the affairs of this life, that he may please him who enlisted him as a soldier” (II Tim. 2:3-4). It is to this struggle that White’s hymn alludes. Though the language is simple, it makes the point well.

CH-1) Oft in sorrow, oft in woe,
Onward, Christian, onward go:
Fight the fight, maintain the strife
Strengthened with the Bread of Life.

CH-2) Onward Christians, onward go,
Join the war, and face the foe;
Faint not: Much does yet remain,
Dreary is the long campaign.

CH-3) Shrink not, Christians will ye yield?
Will ye quit the painful field?
Will ye flee in danger’s hour?
Know ye not your Captain’s power?

CH-4) Let your drooping hearts be glad:
March in heavenly armour clad:
Fight, nor think the battle long,
Victory soon shall be your song.

CH-6) Onward then in battle move,
More than conquerors ye shall prove;
Though opposed by many a foe,
Christian soldiers onward go.

Questions:
1) What aspect of the spiritual conflict has touched your life most recently?

2) How has the Lord helped and sustained you in this?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | November 21, 2016

O Homeland!

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Lucy Jane Rider Meyer (b. Sept. 9, 1849; d. Mar. 16, 1922)
Music: Ira David Sankey (b. Aug. 28, 1840; d. Aug. 13, 1908)

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Lucy Meyer)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org (Lucy Meyer)

Note: Lucy Rider was an American educator, author and publisher. In 1885 she married Methodist Episcopal pastor Josiah Meyer, and became active in the denomination in the training of workers, both men and women. Mrs. Meyer wrote a number of hymns, including this passionate one about heaven called, O Homeland!

The word “homeland,” most basically, refers to the country of one’s birth, one’s native land. Those who come to Canada from elsewhere may grow to love their adopted country, but quite naturally they often feel a sense of attachment to the land where they were born.

In 1863, American author Edward Everett Hale published a short story called The Man Without a Country. It’s an example of what is called historical fiction, a story that creates fictional characters to interact with real people and events. Hale’s skill was such that many believed the central character, American Army lieutenant Philip Nolan, was a real person, though he was not.

In the story, Philip Nolan becomes friendly with Aaron Burr (a real person). When Burr is tried for treason, Nolan is accused of being his accomplice. Brought to trial, he bitterly renounces his country, shouting, “I wish I may never hear of the United States again!” After finding him guilty, the judge grants his foolish request, condemning him to spend the rest of his life aboard American naval vessels, with orders from the crew never to mention his country to him again.

For the next fifty-five years, the prisoner never sets foot on land, and never hears from anyone about what is happening in America. But slowly, over the years, he begins to appreciate the value of having a homeland, and he develops a deep love for his country. On board the USS Levant, he takes a crew member to his cabin, where he’s constructed a kind of shrine to his country. He has the officer read, from the Presbyterian Book of Public Prayer, a prayer he has offered morning and evening through the years:

“Most heartily we beseech Thee with Thy favour to behold and bless Thy servant, the President of the United States, and all others in authority.”

Each of us has a homeland or adopted country here on earth, and we should pray for its leaders, that all will have the peace and freedom there to worship and serve the Lord (I Tim. 2:1-4). But more precious by far, to Christians, is our heavenly home. While we may be citizens of a country here on earth, we have one infinitely more wonderful. “For our citizenship is in heaven, from which we also eagerly wait for the Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ” (Phil. 3:20).

When He comes, He will take us to the eternal home He is preparing for us. Jesus promised, “In My Father’s house are many mansions [dwellings, or homes]….I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you to Myself; that where I am, there you may be also” (Jn. 14:2-3). Paul confessed he had “a desire to depart and be with Christ, which is far better” (Phil. 1:23).

We can sense this same warmth of affection in Meyer’s hymn–though I do call to question her words in the second stanza picturing, in the heavenly city:

“[The] sound of children’s voices,
And shout of saintly song.”

Is she suggesting that infants and children who die and enter heaven will remain at that age for all eternity? It seems far more likely that each of us will be resurrected at the ideal adult age granted to Adam and Eve in the beginning, with mature faculties and powers so we can fully enjoy God’s blessings and serve Him. The only passage that speaks of boys and girls playing in the streets (Zech. 8:1-5) is more likely describing the earthly Jerusalem, and Christ’s earthly millennial kingdom, set up at His return (cf. Isa. 11:6-9).

CH-1) O Homeland! O Homeland!
No lonely heart is there,
No rush of blinding anguish,
No slowly dropping tear:
Now like an infant crying
Its mother’s face to see,
O blessed, blessed Homeland,
I stretch my arms to thee!

CH-3) O Homeland! O Homeland!
The veil is very thin
That stretches thy fair meadows
And this cold world between;
A breath aside may blow it,
A heart-throb burst it through,
And bring, in one glad moment,
The pearly gates in view.

Then Lucy Meyer turns her attention to Christ and His bride, the church, in Glory (cf. II Cor. 11:2; Rev. 19:7-9).

CH-4) O Homeland! O Homeland!
One–Chief of all thy band,
One–altogether lovely,
One–Lord of all the land,
Now standeth at thy portals
To welcome there His Bride;
And, resting on His bosom,
I shall be satisfied.

Questions:
1) Are you passionate and patriotic about your own country? Do you pray regularly for its leaders?

2) Are you passionate about your heavenly home? How does this affect your life now?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Lucy Meyer)
The Cyber Hymnal
Hymnary.org (Lucy Meyer)

Posted by: rcottrill | November 18, 2016

I’m Going Through

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Herbert Buffum (b. Nov. 13, 1879; d. Oct. 9, 1939)
Music: Herbert Buffum

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal (Herbert Buffum)
Hymnary.org

Note: Buffum was a prolific, if not polished song writer. He published over a thousand gospel songs. Author Phil Kerr, who is usually quite accurate, says that Buffum began preaching at the age of 17, while the Cyber Hymnal reports he was converted at the age of 18. That seeming conflict is not impossible. There are unsaved preachers–I knew one. And I know of at least a couple of hymn writers who wrote credible gospel songs before they were saved, and were later converted through their own songs! God works in mysterious ways.

Many years ago, my parents had a house built for them in Ontario. My father was the organist of our church, and we always had an organ at home. One of them was a massive old thing, and the contractor warned there was no way it would go through any door or window of the new house. So, it was moved in during early construction, and the house was literally built around it!

That incident came to mind as I thought of the expression “going through.” In life, it refers to things we experience, things we go through, but it also hints there are limits to what’s experienced. We may be going through it now, but there will be an ending to it.

Meantime, whatever we’re going through is our own, not someone else’s experience. Others may think they know exactly how we’re feeling, but they may not. “I know what you’re going through,” must be said with great caution. One person’s financial crisis may look like another’s, but our experience of it is unique. In the same way, our physical pain or family conflict is our own, and may not be identical to what another has had to bear.

We may read about the suffering of the early Christians in times of Roman persecution, but we really know little of the horror of it in any intimate way. What African slaves experienced in nineteenth century America is beyond our full awareness too. Or what about what the Jews went through in Nazi concentration camps, during the 1930’s and ‘40’s?

We may shed tears of outrage at such things, while we’re thrilled by their courage and tenacious hope, but that’s nothing like being there and going through it. When we have an opportunity today, we need to try to understand the trials of others, to empathize, to help sufferers, but it’s not wise to assume we know all about it.

In Second Corinthians 11:23-28, Paul speaks of things he’d gone through as a missionary of the gospel. Beatings, imprisonment, shipwrecks, betrayal, and “besides the other things, what comes upon me daily: my deep concern for all the churches” (vs. 28). Traveling from place to place, Paul had started new churches. But after he moved on, he continued to pray for them (e.g. Col. 1:3; Eph. 1:15-16; I Thess. 1:2-3). And he wrote to them. Many of the New Testament books are letters written to churches he continued to care for.

Do pray for your pastor, and support him in any way you can! And what about your missionaries? Being a missionary or a pastor is a heavy burden, in terms of the mental and physical labour, the challenges to be faced, and the spiritual battles to be fought. American pastor and hymn writer Herbert Buffum learned that early on.

He began preaching at the age of seventeen, and in the early days of his ministry, Buffum served a small church in Utah. He tried to preach the Word of God faithfully, but some kind of conflict arose in the church. After facing the pain of it, and when he failed to resolve it, Pastor Buffum resigned. Whoever was at fault, whatever the details were, it was a devastating experience for the young clergyman.

It was as though the devil was prodding him to see himself as a failure. “Now you’re out of a job, and no one cares about you,” the evil one seemed to say. But Buffum thought about the experience of Job, how that great saint continued to seek after God, even in the face of incredible trials. “[God] knows the way that I take,” said Job, “when He has tested me, I shall come forth as gold (Job 23:10).

Truly, “The righteous will come through [out of] trouble” (Prov. 12:13). It was with that reassurance in 1914 that Hebert Buffum wrote the song, I’m Going Through.

1) Lord, I have started to walk in the light,
Shining upon me from heaven so bright;
I’ve bade the world and its follies adieu,
I’ve started for Glory, and I’m going through.

I’m going through, yes, I’m going through,
I’ll pay the price whatever others do;
I’ll take the road with the Lord’s despised few;
I’m going through, Jesus, I’m going through.

2) I’d rather walk with Jesus alone,
Have for my pillow, like Jacob, a stone,
Living each moment with His face in view,
Than to turn from the pathway and fail to go through.

Questions:
1) What difficult challenges and changes are you going through at this time?

2) How is the Lord helping you through them?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (none)
The Cyber Hymnal (Herbert Buffum)
Hymnary.org

Posted by: rcottrill | November 16, 2016

I Know a Name

Graphic Bob New Glasses 2015HOW TO USE THIS BLOG
1) The Almanac. Click on the month you want in the side-bar, then the specific date. The blog will tell you what happened in hymn history on that day.
2) Reflections. There is always a current article on a hymn. But you can find many others by clicking on the Index tab. (More being added all the time.)
3) Topical Articles are opinion pieces on many aspects sacred music.
4) To Donate. If you can help with the cost of developing and maintaining this site, click on the “Support” tab above and the page will show you how.

Also see 30+ Ideas for Promoting Hymn Singing in your church. As others have contributed ideas, this wonderful resource has grown to over 80 items now. And, for more than three dozen reasons why congregations should still use hymn books rather than merely projecting words on the wall, see The Value of Hymn Books.

Words: Haldor Lillenas (b. Nov. 19, 1885; d. Aug. 18, 1959)
Music: Haldor Lillenas

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Haldor Lillenas born, died)
The Cyber Hymnal (Haldor Lillenas)
Hymnary.org

Note: As a baby, Haldor came with his parents from Norway, and the family settled in America. He later trained and served as a pastor, but it’s in Christian music he made his mark. In 1924 he founded the Lillenas Publishing Company, working there until his retirement in 1950. He wrote around 4,000 gospel songs.

Brand names are important in advertising. Companies try to pick a name that is short, easy to say, and easy to remember. Whether it’s cars, computers or spaghetti sauce, when you want it, manufacturers want you to think of their brand first.

There’s a common idea that a name brand product is somehow superior to a generic or no-name one. Maybe so sometimes, but not always. And products bearing a famous name are usually more expensive. You are paying them for the privilege of advertising their name!

An interesting thing has happened with some brand names. They have become so popular they’ve taken over as a generic name for the product, no matter what company produces them. Words such as aspirin and kleenex were originally restricted brand names, though they’ve since entered our everyday vocabulary to represent similar items of various brands.

Personal names have a special significance too. If you had no name, what would people call you? How would they identify you? Rock musician Prince Rogers Nelson, known for years simply as Prince, got into a contract dispute with his record producer. To try to free himself from the contract, he changed his name to an unpronounceable symbol. He literally had no name people could say out loud. To talk about him, disk jockeys resorted to “the artist formerly known as Prince” until he changed his name back again seven years later.

Our name is important when it comes to our financial dealings. The recognition of our name gives us our authority to transact business. That was clearly reinforced by an experience of hymn writer Haldor Lillenas.

In the 1920’s, Mr. Lillenas and his wife were in Denver, Colorado, conducting a series of evangelistic meetings. The church that invited them provided an apartment where they could stay, but they were expected to cover their own expenses for meals. Finding himself short of ready money, Lillenas went to the bank and tried to cash a cheque, but they refused to accommodate him. He was unknown to them. The fact that he was a gospel preacher meant nothing.

But in the apartment building where the couple were staying lived a second hand furniture dealer who was willing to help them by adding his name to the cheque. The man was well known in the city, and his name was enough. Lillenas got the money he needed. And as the teller counted out the cash, this thought came to him:

“Every name has a meaning. Some are powerful because of the owner’s reputation. Others are a liability because of the ill fame of those who have them.”

It was only a short distance from that thought to a consideration of the authority and power in the name of Jesus. Months before, the musician had composed a melody for which he had no words. He simply could not come up with lyrics to fit. But with that experience in the Denver bank, he had his theme, and wrote I Know a Name, about the wonderful name of Jesus.

Jesus demonstrated divine power while He was on earth. “God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power, who went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil” (Acts 10:30). For us today He has:

¤ Power to save us: “The gospel of Christ…is the power of God to salvation for everyone who believes” (Rom. 1:16).

¤ Power to keep us saved: “Therefore He is also able to save to the uttermost those who come to God through Him, since He always lives to make intercession for them” (Heb. 7:25; cf. II Tim. 1:12)

¤ Power to meet our needs: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me” (Phil. 4:13; cf. vs. 19; Heb. 4:14-16).

¤ Power to energize our service for Him: “With great power the apostles gave witness to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus. And great grace was upon them all” (Acts 4:33; cf. Matt. 28:18-20; II Cor. 9:8).

3) I know a name that dispels the powers of evil,
I know a name that can break the tempter’s snare;
I know a name that unlocks the gate of heaven,
When through its merits I go to God in prayer.

I know a name, a wonderful name,
That wonderful name is Jesus.

Questions:
1) What examples can you think of when the authority and power of your name accomplished something?

2) How have you experienced the authority and power of the Lord Jesus in your life?

Links:
Wordwise Hymns (Haldor Lillenas born, died)
The Cyber Hymnal (Haldor Lillenas)
Hymnary.org

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